The following events and activities are scheduled to take place over the course of the academic year in conjunction with the “Water In Our World” campus theme. This list is subject to change so please check back periodically for updates:

 

Curriculum for the Environment & Ecology Seminar Lecture by Dr. Ryan Emanuel titled Ecohydrologic Imprints on Runoff Generation and Carbon Cycling in Forested Headwaters scheduled for Thursday January 22 at 4:00 PM in Wilson Hall 107. Emanuel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University whose area of expertise is watershed hydrology and ecophysiology. For more information: https://cee.unc.edu/sem/s15/EmanuelPoster.pdf.

 

Carolina Performing Arts presentation of Perilous Crossings by Shabana Azmi scheduled for Friday January 23, 2015, at 8:00 PM in Memorial Hall. In this unique insight into the life of an artist, Shabana Azmi – one of India’s most famous screen and stage performers as well as a social activist – will screen her controversial film, Deepa Mehta’s Fire (1996). The story of a young woman breaking free from the stifling bonds of tradition, Fire is one of the first portrayals of a lesbian relationship in Indian cinema. In a post-film discussion, Shabana will talk about her experiences with the film. Single and student tickets are available starting at $10. This performance coincides with Streams of Spirit – Water Music From South Asia curated by Professor Afroz Taj in the Department of Asian Studies which explores the connection between water and South Asian culture. For more information on the individual performance: https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/ros_perf_series/shabana-azmi-perilous-crossings/. To learn more about Streams of Spirit: https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/the-overture/streams-of-spirit-water-music-from-south-asia/.

 

UNC Geography Department Colloquium Series lecture by Dr. Jim Heffernan titled Water and land in cities: Macro-scale signatures of urban nature scheduled for Friday January 30 at 3:45 PM in Saunders Hall Room 220. Heffernan is an Assistant Professor in the at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment whose research primarily addresses the causes and consequences of major changes in ecosystem structure. Refreshments will be served from 3:30PM to 5PM.

 

Environmental Sciences and Engineering Seminar lecture by Dr. R. Wayne Litaker titled Ciguatera fish poisoning: public health, ecological and economic consequences of this neglected tropical illness scheduled for Wednesday February 4 at 12:20 PM in Michael Hooker Research Center Room 0001. Litaker is a Research Fisheries Biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

 

Curriculum for the Environment & Ecology Seminar Lecture by Dr. Brett Froelich titled Vibrio ecology in an estuary impacted by extreme climatic events: Observed reactions and future predictions scheduled for Thursday February 5 at 4:00 PM in Genome Sciences Building Room 1378. Froelich is a Post Doctoral Researcher at the UNC Institute for Marine Sciences located in Morehead City, North Carolina. For more information: https://cee.unc.edu/sem/s15/FroelichPoster.pdf.

 

UNC Geography Department Colloquium Series lecture by Dr. Mark Williams titled Bhutan and Nepal: Disappearing Himalayan Glaciers, Water Security in High Asia, Temples, Elephants, and Phalluses scheduled for Friday February 6 at 3:45 PM in Saunders Hall Room 220. Williams is a Geography Professor at the University of Colorado – Boulder and a Fellow at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research. Refreshments will be served from 3:30PM to 5PM.

 

2015 NC Water and Wastewater Finance Course scheduled for February 10-11, 2015, at the UNC School of Government. Hosted by the Environmental Finance Center at UNC, this annual workshop provides utility practitioners with new skills and up-to-date information on infrastructure finance planning strategies and funding resources. This workshop is a part of the EFC’s Water Management Leadership Program. For more information: http://www.efc.sog.unc.edu/event/2015-nc-water-and-wastewater-finance-course.

 

Screening of the documentary film Come Hell or High Water: The Battle of Turkey Creek scheduled for Thursday February 12 at 6:00 PM in the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. The film tells the story of the African American community of Turkey Creek on the gulf coast of Mississippi as they battle developers and politicians in an effort to save their community’s land, history, and culture. This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for the Environment at UNC-Chapel Hill and the Department of Communication Studies, in partnership with the Duke Environmental Law and Policy Clinic and Working Films, a Wilmington, NC, based documentary film company. Admission is free and open to the public and filmmaker Leah Mahan and other local environmental justice leaders will be in attendance.

 

Will the Environment Survive a Renewed Middle East Peace Process? A Blueprint for Progress scheduled for Sunday February 22 at 12:00 PM in Gardner Hall Room 105. UNC Hillel presents Dr. Alon Tal, UNC alumnus, founder of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies and Professor, Department of Desert Ecology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

Because of its modest size, Israel’s environmental problems are largely trans-boundary. Without cooperation with its neighbors, progress in areas from stream restoration to species repatriation will be modest at best. This lecture reviews over twenty years of “below the radar” environmental cooperation in the region and considers the present peace process and how it might be leveraged to ensure an ecological dividend for the region.

This event is co-sponsored by UNC Global, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies, the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies, A Drink for Tomorrow and UNC Student Government.​​​

 

Global Research Institute Spring 2015 Water Speaker Series lecture by Dr. Sterling Evans titled Damning Sonora: Water, Agriculture, and Environmental Change in Northwest Mexico scheduled for Tuesday February 24 at 5:30 PM in FedEx Global Education Center Room 4003. Evans is the Louise Welsh Chair and Director of Graduate Studies in the University of Oklahoma’s History Department.

His presentation seeks to explore the water history of Sonora, Mexico (just south of Arizona). Every river in the state has been dammed, some more than once. The result is that Sonora, characterized by some of North America’s harshest deserts, is now the most agriculturally productive region of Mexico via intensive irrigation made possible by the dams. Along the way there have been serious social and environmental consequences, all of which are significant aspects of damming Sonora.

This speaker series is co-sponsored by the UNC Water Theme Committee and the Department of History with additional event co-sponsorship for this lecture by The Institute for the Study of the Americas. For more information: http://gri.unc.edu/events/damming-sonora-water-agriculture-and-environmental-change-in-northwest-mexico/.

 

PlayMakers Repertory Company presenation of An Enemy of the People, a play by Henrik Ibsen and adapted by Arthur Miller, running from February 25 through March 15 at the Paul Green Theatre in the UNC Center for Dramatic Art. In this story, a man discovers an environmental threat to his community, in this case, contamination of a local water source, and he is forced to stand alone, courageously exposing corruption and lies threatening to destroy the town he loves. Curtain times are 7:30 PM on Tuesdays-Sundays and 2:00 PM for Saturday and Sunday matinees with tickets starting at $15. For more information: http://bit.ly/1LwRoWr.

 

Institute for the Environment Brown Bag Lunch featuring Todd BenDor and Michele Drostin scheduled for Thursday February 26 at 12:00 PM at the Institute for the Environment offices located at 100 Europa Drive, Suite 490, in Chapel Hill. Todd BenDor, an Associate Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at UNC, will discuss his current project regarding how climate change is transforming the U.S. Southern coastal plain. Michele Drostin, with the Institute for the Environment’s Environmental Resource Program, will provide an overview and update on the NC Watershed Stewardship Network.

 

Environmental Sciences and Engineering Seminar lecture by Panitan Jutaporn titled Magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resins and membranes: A perfect match for drinking water treatment? scheduled for Wednesday March 4 at 12:20 PM in Michael Hooker Research Center Room 0001. Jutaporn is a PhD candidate in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering Department of the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

 

Marine Sciences Department Seminar lecture by Dr. Laura Moore titled Ecomorphodynamic Feedbacks and Couplings between Landscape Subsystems influence Barrier Island Response to Changing Climate scheduled for Wednesday March 4 at 3:00 PM in Murray Hall Room G201. Dr. Moore is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences and in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology at UNC who conducts much of her research through the Coastal Environmental Change Lab, also at UNC.

 

Global Research Institute Spring 2015 Water Speaker Series lecture by Dr. James McCann titled The Lights and the Follies: Africa’s Historical Ecologies of Climate Change and Watersheds (Blue Nile and Zambezi) scheduled for Thursday March 5 at 5:30 PM in FedEx Global Education Center Room 1009. At Boston University, McCann is the Archaeology Department Chair, a Professor of History, Associate Director for the African Studies Center, and a Faculty Fellow in the Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer Range Future.

Sub-Saharan Africa in now in the midst of two massive sets of changes in it hydrology. The first consists of the planning and building of hydroelectic/irrigation dam projects on its river systems (the Congo, the Zambezi, the Blue Nile, the Volta, and the While Nile). The second “wave” will be the expected regional and global climate changes that will have distinctive effects on Africa and its hydrologies. Can the past foretell the longer-range future?

This speaker series is co-sponsored by the UNC Water Theme Committee and the Department of History. For more information: http://gri.unc.edu/events/the-lights-and-the-follies-africas-historical-ecologies-of-climate-change-and-watersheds-blue-nile-and-zambezi/.

 

Marine Sciences Department Seminar lecture by Dr. Robert F. Chen titled Environmental Sensing Networks for Illuminating Coastal Carbon Dynamics scheduled for Wednesday March 18 at 3:00 PM in Murray Hall Room G201. Dr. Chen is a Professor of Environmental, Earth, and Ocean Sciences at the University of Massachusetts (Boston) whose research focuses on the movement of carbon from land to ocean.

Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology Seminar lecture by Xavier Basurto titled The Social Impacts of Marine Protected Areas in Fishing Communities. Evidence from Observations, Interviews, Surveys and Experiments scheduled for Thursday March 19 at 4:00 PM in Genome Sciences Building Room 1378. Basurto is an Assistant Professor of Sustainability Science at Duke University’s Nicholas School for the Environment. For more information: https://cee.unc.edu/sem/s15/BasurtoPoster.pdf.

 

Carolina Performing Arts presentation of Songs from the Lands of Five Rivers by Sanam Marvi scheduled for March 20, 2015, at 8:00 PM in Memorial Hall. The young and mesmerizing Pakistani Sufi/folk singer Sanam Marvi explores the music of the Punjab – the land of five rivers. Straddling the India-Pakistan border, the Punjab was divided in two by the 1947 Partition of India. The songs of Punjab emerge from the Sufi romances of Heer Ranjha, Sohni Mahiwal and Mirza Sahiban, many episodes of which are set on the banks of Punjab’s rivers. Sanam will also interpret hymns by saint-poets Baba Farid and Kabir Das as championed by Guru Nanak, the founder of Sikhism. Guru Nanak himself found his revelation in the waters of one of the Punjab’s rivers. Single and student tickets are available starting at $10. This performance coincides with Streams of Spirit – Water Music From South Asia curated by Professor Afroz Taj in the Department of Asian Studies which explores the connection between water and South Asian culture. For more information on the individual performance: https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/ros_perf_series/sanam-marvi-songs-from-the-lands-of-five-rivers/. To learn more about Streams of Spirit: https://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/the-overture/streams-of-spirit-water-music-from-south-asia/.

 

The Daniel A. Okun Chapter of Engineers Without Borders at UNC will host it’s annual 6K Run/Walk for Water on Saturday March 21 at the Carolina North Forest at 9:30 AM. Advance registration is $20 and race day registration costs $25, which includes a t-shirt, a raffle ticket, pre-race yoga session, post-run snacks, and the joy of donating to a worthwhile cause. All proceeds from the run benefit the UNC Engineers Without Borders local and international projects. For more information: https://uncewb.wordpress.com/annual-fundraisers/annual-6k-run/.

 

UNC “Water in Our World” pan-campus theme and the Distinguished Writer-in-Residence Program in the Department of English and Comparative Literature present “Nor any drop to drink”: A Panel Discussion
scheduled for Monday March 23 at 3:30 PM in Hyde Hall. Author and environmentalist Terry Tempest Williams, watershed expert Professor Lawrence Band (Director, UNC Institute for the Environment), and scholar-oysterman Professor Bernard Herman (Chair, UNC Department of American Studies) share their love of our rivers, sounds, and seas and their deep-seated concerns over the future of water in our world.  Our panelists bring many perspectives to bear on the issues, and their conversation promises to be passionate, enlightening, and motivating.  UNC Creative Writing Professor and N.C. Coastal Federation board member Bland Simpson moderates. This event is free and open to the public.

 

Environmental Sciences and Engineering Seminar lecture by Kristen Downs titled Platonic or hostile?: Characterizing the relationship between climate change and diarrheal disease scheduled for Wednesday March 25 at 12:20 PM in Michael Hooker Research Center Room 0001. Downs is a PhD candidate in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering Department of the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

 

Marine Sciences Department Seminar lecture by Molly Bost titled Estuarine Sediment Accretion in Coastal North Carolina scheduled for Wednesday March 25 at 3:00 PM in Murray Hall Room G201. Bost is a Master’s student in Marine Sciences at UNC and also serves as a Teaching Assistant in the department.

 

A Drink For Tomorrow presents their annual Spring Banquet titled Ripple Effect: A Reflection on UNC’s Water Theme on Thursday March 26 at 6 PM in the Great Hall of the Frank Porter Graham Student Union Building. This year’s event will serve as a retrospective on the University’s three year-long water theme which will conclude this spring and feature much water-related discussion and reflection, remarks and perspective by Chancellor Folt, and catering by Mediterranean Deli. Tickets can be purchased online at http://www.etix.com/ticket/online/performanceSearch.jsp?performance_id=3709077&cobrand=CarolinaUnion.

 

Third Annual ConvergeNC Southern Music Festival scheduled for March 27th, 2015, at 6:00 PM at 140 West Franklin Street Plaza. This year, ConvergeNC is excited to join forces with UNC’s campus-wide theme “Water In Our World” and Chapel Hill’s Parks and Recreation Department, moving to the heart of Chapel Hill for a free, public celebration our community’s natural and creative resources. The concert will be free and open to all ages. Food trucks, vendors, and street performers will also join the festivities. The full artist lineup will be released in late February.

ConvergeNC seeks to enrich our conception of Southernness and of the cultural identity of this place and time. As part of UNC’s Water Theme, this year’s festival asks: what does water mean in the South, and how do we explore that meaning through music? It also falls on the first day of the Global American South Conference, focused this year on food. ConvergeNC will serve as an intersection of these two themes and their meaning in the American South. For more information, contact Libby Rodenbough at (336) 339-6722 Ÿor convergeNCfest@gmail.com or visit http://convergencfest.com/.

 

UNICEF at Carolina’s Water Walk scheduled for Saturday March 28 at 10:00 AM beginning at the Campus Y Building. UNICEF at Carolina participates in UNICEF’s TAP Project, a national campaign to help give children in impoverished nations access to clean water.  As a part of our celebration of World Water Week in March and in conjunction with the University’s theme “Water In Our World”, the walk is a simulation of how far people have to travel in developing countries in order to access clean water. There will be race bags with t-shirts, a speaker, and food provided. For more information: http://waterwalkforunicef.eventzilla.net/web/event?eventid=2139076510.

 

Marine Sciences Department Seminar lecture by Dr. Oscar Schofield titled Understanding the Hot Days along West Antarctic Peninsula in the Dawn of Robotic Oceanography scheduled for Wednesday April 1 at 3:00 PM in Murray Hall Room G201. Dr. Schofield is a Professor of Oceanography at Rutgers University who was selected as this year’s Gussenhoven Lecturer in Marine Sciences.

 

Marine Sciences Department Seminar lecture by Dr. Martin Benavides titled Global Genetic Stock Structure of the Copper (Carcharhinus brachyurus) and Dusky Sharks (Carcharhinus obscurus): Interspecific Comparisons and Implications for Management scheduled for Wednesday April 8 at 3:00 PM in Murray Hall Room G201. Dr. Benavides is a Science Teacher at Williamsburg Charter High School in New York City.

 

Global Research Institute Spring 2015 Water Speaker Series lecture by Dr. David Biggs titled Life in the Post-Mekong: Contested Histories and Techno-Futures scheduled for Tuesday April 14 at 5:30 PM in FedEx Global Education Center Room 1005. At the University of California at Riverside, Dr. Biggs is an Associate Professor in the Department of History.

This speaker series is co-sponsored by the UNC Water Theme Committee, the Department of History, and the Carolina Asia Center. For more information: http://gri.unc.edu/events/life-in-the-post-mekong-contested-histories-and-techno-futures/.

 

Chancellor Carol Folt will deliver the lecture “Water in Our World: Past Is Present, Future Is Fragile, But We Can Make a Difference” at 5:30 PM on Thursday, April 23, 2015, at the Nelson Mandela Auditorium in the FedEx Global Education Center. For more information: http://global.unc.edu/news/chancellor-folt-to-deliver-lecture-on-water-research-april-23/.

 

WaSH Performance Index Launch presented by the Water Institute at UNC scheduled for Friday May 8 at 10:00 AM in Rosenau Hall’s Mayes Center. Created by a interdisciplinary team of UNC faculty and researchers, this index will show which countries around the world are leaders in eroding inequalities in and improving access to water and sanitation for their citizens.

Catarina de Albuquerque, vice chair of Sanitation and Water for All and former United Nations special rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation, and Edmund J. Cain, vice president of grant programs for the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation, will offer remarks and participate in discussion at the launch along with the team of UNC researchers who led this project.

A live webcast will also be accessible at http://bit.ly/1D5TAPG. Media are welcome on-site but must contact The Water Institute for seating as space is limited. Questions from media and the public can be submitted from the webcast site. The full report is available at http://waterinstitute.unc.edu/wash-performance-index/.

 

2015 Water Microbiology Conference scheduled for May 18-22, 2015, at the William & Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education. Organized by the Water Institute at UNC, this week-long event creates a forum for researchers and practitioners focused on microbiology and public health issues to come together around the intersection of the two. The main themes for this event are: Sources, Exposure, Analytical Methods, along with Management and Treatment. For more information: http://watermicroconference.web.unc.edu/.